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Is The Release Of $150 Billion Of Iran's Sanctioned Funds A Concern?

With the historical deal announced between Iran and the U.S., many are concerned about the billions of dollars that will be released when sanctions are dropped. Should this influx of cash to the Iranian government be a concern?

50% of writers and pundits say yes
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Is The Release Of $150 Billion Of Iran's Sanctioned Funds A Concern?  

Writers and pundits who say or about the topic, "Is The Release Of $150 Billion Of Iran's Sanctioned Funds A Concern?"
last 24 hours | npr
When Sanctions Lift, How Will Iran Spend Its Billions? : Parallels : NPR - NPR

"...Assad's government has already received billions in loans from Iran, and a rising economic tide would certainly allow Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps to replenish its coffers.But those familiar with Iran's ravaged economy say it's unlikely Tehran will go on a foreign policy spending spree.For starters, says Anthony Cordesman at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Hamas and Hezbollah couldn't absorb billions of dollars in cash and weaponry."We're probably talking at most about several million, over time," he says. "You're not going to turn the Hezbollah into a major conventional force; you're not going to turn Hamas into a major force because you can't get to them, you can't supply them. So I just think we really do need to keep this in careful perspective."..." see full article


878 days ago | jpupdates
How Much of Iran Deal's Sanctions Relief Will Fund Terror? - JP Updates
"...A major component of the narrative on Iran has been its providing of training, funding, and weapons to terror groups such as Hezbollah, Hamas, and Islamic Jihad, as well as to the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. New Jersey attorney Stephen M. Flatow recalled that when he sued Iran in 1998 for the murder of his daughter, Alisa Flatow, by the Palestinian terrorist group Islamic Jihad in 1995, he was able to introduce evidence, under seal, in other words not released to the public, that Iran was funding Islamic Jihad. During the Flatow trial, an expert on Iran testified that the Iranians specifically budgeted money to support terror attacks in Israel. The goal of our lawsuit was to make it financially unprofitable for Iran to continue to support terrorists. We believed that if you hit the Iranians in the pocketbook with large payouts and many of them, they'd get out of the terror business, Flatow told JNS.Flatow eventually won a judgment of $247 million from Iran in a landmark ruling, but has never collected any of that sum directly from the Islamic Republic. Instead, his family recovered $25 million via legislation that was worked out with former president Bill Clinton's administration. The rest of the judgment, he said, remains unpaid and will likely be impossible to enforce...." see full article


884 days ago | jns
Following the money: How much of Iran deal's sanctions relief will fund terror? - JNS.org
"...A major component of the narrative on Iran has been its providing of training, funding, and weapons to terror groups such as Hezbollah, Hamas, and Islamic Jihad, as well as to the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. New Jersey attorney Stephen M. Flatow recalled that when he sued Iran in 1998 for the murder of his daughter, Alisa Flatow, by the Palestinian terrorist group Islamic Jihad in 1995, he was able to introduce evidence, under seal, in other words not released to the public, that Iran was funding Islamic Jihad. During the Flatow trial, an expert on Iran testified that the Iranians specifically budgeted money to support terror attacks in Israel. The goal of our lawsuit was to make it financially unprofitable for Iran to continue to support terrorists. We believed that if you hit the Iranians in the pocketbook with large payouts and many of them, they'd get out of the terror business, Flatow told JNS.org...." see full article


885 days ago | npr
Lifting Sanctions Will Release $100 Billion To Iran. Then What? : Parallels : NPR - NPR

"...During a press conference on Wednesday, President Obama conceded that some of the money could be used to stir up trouble in the Middle East.But Obama said Iran's shattered economy needs to be rebuilt after years of sanctions and it is their money."We're not writing Iran a check," he said. "This is Iran's money that we were able to block from them having access to."It's very likely the bulk of the $100 billion will not even be sent back to Iran, says Elizabeth Rosenberg, who worked on the Iran sanctions issue at the Treasury Department and is now with the Center for a New American Security...." see full article


885 days ago | thedailybeast
Obama Admin Fears Iran Deal Will Release Billions for Terror Attacks

"...Iran has billions in assets frozen by an international sanctions regime led by the United States and other world powers. Should a nuclear agreement be reached, as is expected later this week, these assets would be eventually released to the Iranian government. We are of course aware and concerned that, despite the massive domestic spending needs facing Iran, some of the resulting sanctions relief could be used by Iran to fund destabilizing actions, a State Department official told The Daily Beast.Ahead of a widely expected deal with Iran this week, the administration is talking tough: The State Department official said that the U.S. sees Iran clearly for what it is: the world's foremost state sponsor of terrorism; a supporter of terrorist groups such as Hezbollah and Hamas; a backer of the Assad regime's brutality in Syria; and a force for instability in Yemen. ..." see full article


886 days ago | payvand
With Iranian "Windfall," Perfect is the Enemy of the Good
"...What will Iran do with the money it gets as a result of an expected nuclear deal? That's a big question swirling around Washington these days. There's going to be a good of money involved, likely north of $100 billion in frozen funds that Iran will be entitled to repatriate. There will be even more in increased revenue, though this will trickle in more slowly than many think, owing to the required investments and time needed to get, for instance, the energy sector operating at anything near its capability. It's so much that commentators across the political spectrum have taken to referring to it as a windfall. That's not what the word really means, but okay.The most reasonable take I've seen on the question comes from RAND's Alireza Nader, who predicts that Iran will largely spend the money at home in an attempt to ease the woes created by the economic mismanagement of the Mahmoud Ahmadinejad era that sanctions only exacerbated. (Other have proffered a similar analysis.) That said, Nader notes, Iran will still probably inject some of the money into its military and foreign policy. That latter possibility is what has opponents of diplomacy going ballistic. Their argument goes something like this: We can't make this deal with Iran because it's going to allow Iran to run wild all over the Middle East and spread terror the world over. I exaggerate only slightly...." see full article


886 days ago | america.aljazeera
Iran's elites likely to benefit most from sanctions relief
"...The sanctions regime also had a negative effect on the strength of the rial, Iran's currency, as well as freezing access to reserves of hard currency held in overseas accounts. All told, international banking compliance with U.S. sanctions restricted access to at least $100 billion dollars of Iran's foreign reserves.Under the terms of the new deal, once Iran demonstrates compliance in placing verifiable caps on its nuclear program, the country will gain access to frozen funds. Other financial easements are also supposed to accompany the lifting of various sanctions.But some believe the money will benefit the country's entrenched economic elite, whose position on power arguably increased under the sanctions regime and who now can further reap the benefits of their positions.One of the powerful elite interests is the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), an influential branch of Iran's armed forces that commands a vast economic empire in the country. It is expected to exploit the easing of sanctions for its own purposes...." see full article


886 days ago | globalresearc
Is a Nuclear Deal with Iran Being Stalled Because the West Cant Pay Tehrans Money Back?
"...Are Iranian financial assets and funds really frozen or are they also being utilized as loans or collateral? In other words, have Iran's frozen funds been channeled elsewhere by the US and the EU to make up for their own economic problems and the economic war against Russia? Do the financial liabilities of those holding Iranian funds exceed their financial assets? More simply asked: can the countries that froze Iran's money pay Tehran its money back or are they stalling, because they cannot return all the money that was frozen under sanctions?The position of the US and France are excuses to avoid lifting the sanctions on Iran and to avoid returning Iranian funds. Their goal is to neutralize the Iranian nuclear energy program while keeping the sanctions and appropriating Iranian funds. This is why the frame of time for Washington's promises to remove the sanctions have no guarantees. What the US is doing is is trying to impose legal obligations on Iran without giving any guarantees on the removal of sanctions. Washington's promises to remove the sanctions also gradually became longer, changing from six months to a year to over a year, and have had additionally conditions placed on them...." see full article


886 days ago | nationalinterest
Who Benefits from Iran Sanctions Relief?
"...So who would benefit from the post-deal sanctions relief? There is no easy answer to this, as all parties concerned the Rouhani government, the Iranian people, and the Revolutionary Guards in control of Iran's regional policies are likely to benefit. Nevertheless, much of the economic boost from sanctions relief is likely to be consumed internally by the Rouhani government, the political-economic elite, and to some extent the Iranian people. Those responsible for Iran's foreign policy, including the Revolutionary Guards, will have more resources, but Iran's regional influence is not as much dependent on money as it is on Tehran's ability to exploit the growing instability around it. And that takes less funding than often assumed...." see full article


886 days ago | takepart
Remembering the Flight: What Iran Needs If Sanctions End - TakePart
"...Like much of the world, I hope the deal paves the way for a lasting peace, and maybe even some functional diplomacy between Iran and the United States. Time will tell how the accord will change life for Iranians, and the country's fraught relationship with the world, but 36 years is long enough to weigh the effects of sanctions. That suffering has been borne by a country of 77 million people who don't seem to have much say in a democracy that can be overruled by the notions of their supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Dissidents and journalists line cells of the country's notorious prisons, and the broader public bears the brunt of whatever the political apparatus in Iran wishes a human rights discussion that was absent from the Iran deal...." see full article



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